• Deep legacy and tradition

    The original and longest continually published artists' periodical of the 20th century.

    Monthly from 1981-2006, ARTLIFE is the original and longest continually published artists’ periodical of the twentieth century. Each and every issue contains original, hand-made and hand-signed works of art.

    Deep legacy and tradition
  • ARTLIFE HQ “OFFICE DOOR” ALWAYS OPEN Since 1981

    ARTLIFE archives will take you into the hidden history of 20th century art.

    Underneath the known worlds of artists and pieces you have seen, there exists another world that we have catalogued and chronicled.

    ARTLIFE HQ OFFICE DOOR, ALWAYS OPEN Since 1981 (c) ARTLIFE HQ OFFICE DOOR, ALWAYS OPEN Since 1981 (c)
    ARTLIFE HQ “OFFICE DOOR” ALWAYS OPEN  Since 1981
  • Henning Mittendorf, Frankfurt, Germany

    ARTLIFE delivers the secret archive behind museum walls.

    Over a thirty year period, ARTLIFE is where the artists of the world have published their early works, the pieces before the ones you know about.

    Henning Mittendorf, Frankfort, Germany (c)
    Henning Mittendorf, Frankfurt, Germany
  • 21st Anniversary of ARTLIFE

    ARTLIFE opens the kimono for the contemporary art scene.

    The artists you've met in galleries........we've met them at 3 a.m. in their studios. We've sat on rooftops and at hidden beach coves with them. This is their archive. These are their early works.

    Purchase $15
    21st Anniversary of ARTLIFE
  • “21 at last” In Multiple Languages. M.B. Hanrahan, Ventura, California

    ARTLIFE reveals the magic behind modern art.

    Need we say more?

    Purchase $15
    “21 at last” In Multiple Languages.  M.B. Hanrahan, Ventura, California

ARTLIFE… WHAT IS IT?

“ARTLIFE is not meant to be a monologue, but a conversation among creative people, all of whom are vital, interested, and alive. Each month we will strive to improve the quality of our presentation and include the work of those who would like to join the conversation.” ~Joe Cardella, Editor/Publisher ARTLIFE

In the 30 years since Editor and Publisher Joe Cardella wrote ARTLIFE’s opening statement, it has become an extraordinary publication in which nearly every page is an original work of art. Each month’s issue presents a diverse array of media, including collages, original prints and photos, dimensional objects, poetry and prose.

Although ARTLIFE limits its monthly circulation to only 200 copies, its impact is notable. It is collected by such major institutions as New York’s Museum of Modern Art, the Brooklyn Museum of Fine Arts, and the Getty Trust in Santa Monica. It is also in many private collections, archives and museums throughout the United States, Europe, and Japan. Today, ARTLIFE is the best selling periodical at the Guggenheim Museum bookstore in Soho, New York.

 

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ARTLIFE… A LITTLE HISTORY

While ARTLIFE is now well established, it began as a four-page newsletter produced by Cardella who, feeling stifled in Santa Barbara’s somewhat conservative art community, needed to reach out to like-minded conceptual and progressive artists. “I felt I was in a terribly isolated situation, surrounded by people who were not attuned to what I was trying to do.”Reproducing the first ARTLIFE on a photocopy machine, he tells us; “when sent, a communication will hopefully be received, deciphered, and responded to.”

The result became a phenomenon that grew beyond its California roots and now comprises an international network of artists, poets, and writers. As it works now, artists and writers submit signed and numbered editions for inclusion in ARTLIFE.Cardella compiles and binds them into a cohesive whole. His editing results in striking sequences and patterns among the different art and literary works within each rare, limited edition.

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ARTLIFE   PUBLISHER & EDITOR

JoeCardella

Joe Cardella, publisher/editor of ARTLIFE

joe@art-life.com

Letter from the Publisher of ARTLIFE – Joe Cardella

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Back Issues

 

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 Copyright ©1999 Joe Cardella. All rights reserved.

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 Copyright ©2002 Joe Cardella.. All rights reserved.
“War on Terrorism”
Joe Cardella – Ventura, California

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21ST ANNIVERSARY ISSUE

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 Copyright ©2001 Joe Cardella. All rights reserved.
“ARTLIFE 21st Anniversary Issue”
Michael Row – Santa Barbara, California

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 Copyright ©2000 Christine Fogg. All rights reserved.
Christine Fogg – Anza, California

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 Copyright ©2000 Judith Cook & Christine Fogg. All rights reserved.
“The Queens of ARTLIFE”
Judith Cook & Christine Fogg – California

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 Copyright ©1999 Joe Cardella. All rights reserved.
Dennis Saleh – Oceanside, California

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Dennis Saleh – Oceanside, California

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Chritine Fogg – Anza, California

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Joe Cardella – Ventura, California

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Ray Clark Dickson – San Luis Obisbo, California

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 Copyright©1998 M. B. Hanrahan. All rights reserved.

M. B. Hanrahan: concept & model

Troy Overman: photography – Ventura, California

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 Copyright©1999 Phil Taggart. All rights reserved.
Phil Taggart – Ventura, California

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Front cover by Michael Row – Santa Barbara, California

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Front cover by Ann Harithas – Houston, Texas

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Front cover by Jane McKinney

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Front cover by Judith Cook

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 Copyright©1998 Donna Granata. All rights reserved.
Front cover by Donna Granata – “Focus on the Masters” ™
Portrait of Joe Cardella, ART/LIFE founder

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 Copyright©1998 Joe Cardella. All rights reserved.
“American Tradition” – Joe Cardella- Ventura, California

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 Copyright ©1998 Douglas Spaulding. All rights reserved.
Douglas Spaulding – Ventura, California

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 Copyright ©1998 Joe Carlella. All rights reserved.
Evidence of the Hand/Mind of the Arist – Joe Cardella – Ventura, California

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 Copyright ©1998 Don Foster. All rights reserved.
Cover art by Don Foster – Houston, Texas

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 Copyright ©1998 Mark Lane. All rights reserved.
Cover art by Mark Lane – Ventura, California

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 Copyright ©1997 Christine Fogg. All rights reserved.
Christine Fogg – Desert Hot Springs, California

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 Copyright ©1997 Joe Cardella. All rights reserved.
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ARTLIFE MOCA

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MOCA RENTAL GALLERY INFORMATION

Gallery space is now available for rent at ARTLIFE MOCA. View may be length or widthwise. Ten images are the suggested number for each show so that images on walls will be legible. Each image on gallery wall will enlarge for viewing when clicked on. Artist’s E-mail adress included with credits. Global access. Twenty-Four hours per day, 365 days per year.
Cost: Gallery installation, lighting and MOCA Directory listing for first month, $350.00. Each additional month: $30.00 (one dollar per day).

Contact: joe@art-life.com for reservations. All proposals are NOT accepted. Proposals and samples of work may be sent to: ARTLIFE MOCA P.O.BOX 23020 VENTURA,CA. 93002. Attn: Joe Cardella, Director.

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OUTLAW ART of SALVATORE SCARPITTA: GALLERY SEVEN

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OUTLAW ART of SALVATORE SCARPITTA: GALLERY SIX

In conjunction with the ARTCAR MUSEUM of Houston, TexasGo to www.artcarmuseum.com for more info and essays (see exhibits).
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Frank Gillette’s Evolving Images Gallery Three

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Frank Gillette’s Evolving Images Gallery Four

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Dennis Oppenheim’s Public Artworks: 1981-1998 Gallery One

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Dennis Oppenheim’s Public Artworks: 1981-1998 Gallery Two

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PUBLISHER’S CHOICE – GALLERY FIVE

“Evidence of the Hand/Mind of the Artist”
selected objects & collage by Joe Cardella, 1996-1999

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“Not the Last Supper” Gallery Installation
Judith Cook with Michael Hadley

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DEPARTMENT OF CRAFT: REDEFINED
curated by Judith Cook
“Imagined Landscapes Virtual Gallery”
by Damon Moon & Steven Goldate

ARTLIFE MOCA original notes

ARTLIFE MOCA Archive

ARTLIFE MOCA graphic detail A

ARTLIFE MOCA graphic detail B

“Not the Last Supper” Gallery Installation Judith Cook with Michael Hadley

Statement

Statement

“Art is a lie that enables us to realize the truth” —Picasso

Overall my work is a derivative of and/or a commentary on oxymorons, the concept of chaos in physics and the fine line we walk every day between reality and illusion. Images take form in paintings (both traditional and digital) and through the utilization of a variety of ceramic and mixed media processes .

I work back and forth between two-dimensional and three-dimensional formats often incorporating painted elements in a direct dialogue with sculptural forms. When I incorporate two-dimensional mixed media with clay it is with a conceptual approach where, symbolically, as with my use of color, I choose other materials or objects where they more specifically convey my ideas. I collect a lot of stuff. Stuff is equivocal to junk. Junk makes history. History makes art.

It is complete nonsense to believe that flying machines will ever work.”
- Sir Stanley Mosely

 

Portraits from the series “Not the Last Supper” / CyberCeramics: An Explanation

Iíve long maintained an interest in exploring the possibilities of combining painting, digital imaging and ceramics, a seemingly unlikely alliance, but one I found intriguing.

In 1995 I found myself wondering if there was a way to combine the images I paint with “digital glazes” that I had been creating on my computer to a final format on ceramic tiles. It started simply enough: I placed actual unglazed and glazed ceramic tiles that I had formulated on a flatbed scanner, transferred them to files and then digitally manipulate the surfaces. For a while, these new images which found finality in a digital print, seemed ok. Although the images were fascinating in themselves, I was intrigued with finding a way to transfer those images back to the ceramic medium, which, at that time, had a more tangible reality to me. I explored several methods for transfer, and finally discovered a method (dye sublimation transfer) outside of traditional ceramic decals that completed the cycle thus bringing the digital surfaces back to their beginnings as glazed ceramic tiles. In the process, Iíve had the opportunity to help create a new ceramic approach which is referred to as a form of “cyberceramics.”

The extraordinary thing is how earthly world elements of clay, water and fire, found a partner in the perceived clean-room sterility of digital imaging. I often contemplated whether cyberceramics was just an excuse not to get dirty but realized that in one respect, itís just another technique in realizing images to forms. It is in this context that cyberceramics can be addressed on symbiotic levels. Initially Michael Hadley worked with me on his project as a digital imaging technical assistant. During the development of the images, at times we worked in a collaborative liaison. As the work progressed, evolved and became transformed into mixed media wall relief formats, Michael was instrumental in developing a new space for the works to exist in. Through countless conversations agreeing to disagree to agree, Michael actualized a conceptual gallery to house the portrait plates. The resulting gallery is his vision based on our conversations of space with the final tweaking of the gallery design being a collaborative effort.

The cyberceramic mixed media works represented here are selections from the series “Not the Last Supper” which are 13 portraits that act as both a homage to those individuals who have supported or affected my work with fired ceramic materials and/or as an homage to new forms of digital craft. Iíve been exploring alternative formats of portraiture for the past twelve years and these portrait formats have pushed the boundaries in actualizing my interest in reality and illusion. The “dining format” would not be possible without respectively referencing both forthright and subliminally the works of Leonardo Da Vinci, Judy Chicago, Jeanne Otis and other artists who have utilized dining formats as portraiture. I use the computer as a tool and this tool has in turn transformed my craft and my art. I am a member of INTERSECT (The Society for Electronic Craft Transformation) and fit into this international membership for my work deals with breaking the boundaries of traditional craft definition. The content I have been dealing with has remained a constant, but my format has been transformed via technology tied to social and personal economic issues along with a genuine curiosity in exploring the not possible.

These are objects of ideas not merely an aesthetic experience. The objects were meant to annoy, shake people out of habits of conventional thinking of how a plate exists in space. I thrive on exploring the unknown and Iím sure that my love of observing, listening and being open to change propelled me to be so obsessed with this project for over five years. To have the works go back to their original intent of spatial existenceóthat being cyberspaceófinalizes the whole experience.

In a way CyberCeramics is a form of abstraction taking the concrete object and transforming its physical qualities as well as the spatial qualities/relationships it traditionally existed in. The plate exists only on the screen in digital format taking up a whole new spaceócyberspace. Abstraction occurs in the concept of touch; from relying on actual physical qualities to implied surfaces engaging the viewer in another level of touch. Iíve been accused of mental masturbation to just not wanting to deal with the dirt, mess, etc. of real clay. But to me this project was one of stretching the limits of defined physical surfaces and to have a little fun with technology.

Itís a perverse idea that tweaks standard systems of visual organization going beyond traditional usage of materials as well as conceptual aspects of usage of materials. And at the same time it was a wonderful intellectual play on the material level of ceramics and a play on the exploration of a materialsí possibilities. (See Doc/MLA/Batesman and actual clay piece incorporated into cyberplate) Someone once referred to this project and the processes involved as “the emperorís new clothes” — intellectually clever but what does one do with the virtual images? My response was that many materials of the art making process can seduce us especially with their potential. This is the personal issue with how artists respond to particular materials for materials are indifferent. They do what the hands, the heart and the mind dictate with the dialogue between the material and the maker being of importance. With virtual craft a different space dictates a different way of seeing, touching and dialoguing.

The questioning of reality and abstraction led to the exploration of a visual reality (cyberspace) that can neither be seen nor described in the sense of traditional paradigms of reality but which we all conclude exists. There was a questioning of physical substance and perception. The end result was a deliberate conflict with traditional modelsóit even scared me, made me crazy asking myself is this “real” or not. I became obsessed with making the plates be “real” to my academic mind steeped in traditions of western definitions of art and made paper prints, prints on canvas, prints on acetate. I hung the acetate prints in window panes and cut up the prints into strips, wove the images with a simple basket weave technique then cut traditional vessels forms out of the woven mats. I made black and white ceramic decals and put images of plates on thrown plates and finally had the images transferred via a dye sublimation process to stoneware tiles and incorporated them in assemblages. All the while still looking at the images as to whether they were “real” or not. A separate reality.

I cannot say that this project was just an excuse for learning digital imaging for a good amount of the fine tuning of the images was technically done by Michael Hadley under my direction. But process played a key role in being an initial driving force. The process was of far more interest than the produced objects themselves. The objects were the records of the thoughts and the physical realization of the thought. The initial approach was also coupled with philosophical and conceptual levels and went the full run to the narrative and entertaining in final dining portrait format.

“Not the Last Supper” was a dematerialization of ceramics in general.

This work was a search for the questioning of what is real, the definition of reality, a questioning of space and the act of touch as well as the concept of touch in itself. It was about space and space is directly related to time. And I never had enough time to work fast enough or to work through enough physical objects.

I have been asked as to how this project related to me in terms of being a painter. My response was that of Iíve always been interested in peopleís responses to images. I think of Magritteís “The Treachery of Images: This is Not a Pipe”. I would show people prints of the cyber plates and their responses would be one of “gee, thatís a beautiful plate. Are those objects glued on or painted on or are they decals? How did you handle such small mosaic work?” (see Portrait of Don) All the questions related to the trompe líoeil aesthetic that only I was aware of. The objects in their own individual beauty elicited a response that made people think the objects were physically beautiful and it was interesting to see their reaction of disappointment when I told them the plates actually did not exist in our physical reality. Ah the treachery of images.

In responding to this project as an artist who works within the ceramic realm, I was interested in creating new surfaces beyond what are givens in traditional ceramic formats. Just the whole way of how the images are built in layers like sedimentation relates conceptually to historical elements of ceramics. So, like my predecessors who discovered the transformation of clay by fire and changing the perception of mud and how it exists in space, so does a scanner change the transformation of fired clay into cyberceramics and how it exists in space.

Although certain aspects of this work is part of the ceramic tradition, it is not only the materials or processes that interest me. Rather it is the potential for certain objects to exist in space and time and how that space affects our perception of the object, the synthesis of experience that motivates me. With that being said it is my hope that the interpretation of this work goes beyond the object.

I appreciate you taking the time to view the works.

Judith Cook
January 2000

Visit the INTERSECT web site at http://www.lexicon.net/world/intersect

Detail of ARTLIFE MOCA graphic

©1999 ARTLIFE & Joe Cardella

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Detail of ARTLIFE MOCA Graphic

©1999 ARTLIFE & Joe Cardella

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ARTLIFE MOCA ARCHIVE

Archive Installation Documentation • Ventura, California 1999

 

ARTLIFE MOCA

original notes by Joe Cardella, Ventura, CA

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Artwork for Sale

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“Cupid’s Quiver: Have Gun Will Travel”by Joe Cardella18 x 30 inches – wooden violin case c. 1830 & mixed media $6500

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“Sebastiano, 2002″by Joe Cardella(Church in Crisis – World in Crisis) 25 x 16 x 20 inches Camel Saddle: Middle East Manila Rope: Phillipines Arrows: Texas $9000

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“Gaia”, bronzeLynn Creighton (c) $3,800
www.sacred-source.com
photo by Dina Pieleat

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Freedom or Death Balance Beam, 1999

- Issue #204
(rotates freely on point)

Proposal for Statue of Liberty – $4000

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Exorcism from Heartache, 1996

hand-blown glass, razor wire, barbed wire, thorns, chili peppers & olive oil – $9,000

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3Cutting Edge,

1997 – Preservation Series razor blades, Marvel Mystery Oil – $2000

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Torso

Bamboo Root in Wooden Box, 1999 – $3000

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Handsaw

1997 – $5000 saw blade, hammer handle, construction materials

Cameo Effect Hand-Carved Surfboards

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WHERE TO BUY ARTLIFE

“Back issues ONLY for sale: 1985 to 2005″

Cardella3

Joe Cardella, publisher

(photo: Angela Izzo (c) 2013)

ARTLIFE
P. O. Box 23020
Ventura, CA 93002  USA
805-648-4331
joe@art-life.com
www.art-life.com

Contact

Joe Cardella, publisher

ARTLIFE

P. O. Box 23020 Ventura,

CA 93002 USA 805-648-4331

joe@art-life.com

www.art-life.com

Cardella2Photo by Angela Izzo © 2013